?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Marigold

Leonard Nimoy

So many wonderful tributes, so many wonderful memories of a man whose life touched us all in so many ways.

The moment I will always remember about Leonard Nimoy:

Back in 2009, several friends and I attended a Creation Convention in Las Vegas. Leonard was there, and after he gave his talk he took questions. The questions were pretty much the usual thing you’d expect at a Creation convention.

And then one fan asked this: “What do you have left on your bucket list?”

Leonard’s mood changed from that of an actor repeating lines he’d said many times before (the “bicycle” story, etc.). He became serious, he became intent, he became open. It was as if his personality suddenly “expanded” to encompass everyone in the room.

Leonard said that he had already done all the things on his "some day" list, and at the present moment he was happy and fulfilled and grateful for everything and everyone he has in his life. He went on to give a special thanks to his fans, acknowledging all the support they had given him all through the years – support which had made it possible for him to pursue his passion projects and to live his life the way he wanted to.

The audience was riveted. It was a huge auditorium but I could barely hear anyone breathe. The connection between Nimoy and the audience was electric. My words can’t do justice to the sheer emotion in his voice as he expressed his gratitude to his fans.

Nimoy finished his session by telling the audience "Live Long and Prosper" in a *very* heartfelt way.

Other memories from that convention:

I had to dig for awhile to find a report I posted back then – here’s the rest of it. I’m not rewriting it; I’m keeping it exactly the way I wrote it then.

The Vegas convention was *wonderful*! Bill and Leonard were in absolutely top form, and both were looking good. It's so wonderful seeing them interacting together.

Shatner was on stage first, then both of them, then Nimoy (joined for a couple of moments by Zachary Quinto and by the boy who played young Spock in the movie).

Some interesting questions. I found it very interesting that both of them brought up their own experiences of being a fan. Nimoy talked about the time he met Cary Grant and was completely tonguetied. Shatner talked about taking his granddaughter to a Jonas Brothers concert, and what it was like to be on "the other side" of that sort of fannish adulation.

(End of the Vegas convention report)

I’m also thankful I attended Leonard’s Skype talk at last year’s Shore Leave. He was open and friendly and seemed genuinely delighted to be able to participate in a convention in such a “high tech” way. This being Shore Leave, questions from the audience were a cut above those of the average Creation Con. The one I remember most clearly was a man who told Leonard that he had been inspired by Leonard quitting smoking all those years ago to quit smoking himself. Leonard appeared to be very moved about this, and it seemed to me that he talked to the man for a longer period of time than he devoted to this other answers. Leonard explained during the talk about his COPD and how it was sometimes difficult to move from one part of a room to another. He didn’t dwell on his condition, nor did he minimize it. However, his voice was strong – strong enough to sing “Maiden Wine” - and he was laughing and clearly enjoying himself.

I left the talk happy that I’d had this chance to see him again. However, I had a strong feeling that this would be the last time he’d be able to “attend” anything like this.

I had a bad feeling when he went into the hospital this last time – his health has certainly been shaky for awhile, and there have been other scares. But this felt different. When I heard the news, I wasn’t surprised. But deeply deeply sad.

He truly had a live well lived; something for us all to celebrate even as we mourn.

Comments

Thanks for sharing this. . . .it is comforting to know that he had accomplished all the things he really wanted to!!!
It was a truly amazing moment. I wish I could convey the way that entire room - several thousand people - became so absolutely silent, or the look in his eyes, or the tone in his voice. It was a moment of absolute thanks and gratitude; and his words made me realize exactly what the phrase "a life well lived" means.
He certainly had a full life. That's a good thought to have.

I remember thinking the same thing when he entered the hospital. I used to really like James Franciscus, who died of the same thing. So I read up on it. Terrible disease. So when they spoke of Leonard having chest pains, I pretty much figured the end was near. Even after all the intervening years, there really isn't a lot they can do for you.
No, there isn't much they can do for you at that point. A friend's mother (a lifelong smoker) passed away from COPD several years ago, and prior to that she had been tethered to an oxygen tank for a long time. They had to move to a downstairs apartment because she was no longer able to go up the stairs without a lot of help. It's a horrible thing.
Thank you for sharing these moments, Cat! Leonard sounded like a good man. And having nothing left on his bucket list shows you had a rich, full life. :)

Sad about his disease. Unfortunately quite a few of his generation have been hit with pulmonary diseases because of the acceptance of smoking way back when. I'm glad that people are learning that smoking isn't the way to go!

P.S. I had a bad feeling, too, when I read about his latest hospital visit. :(

Edited at 2015-03-02 02:37 pm (UTC)
It was a truly amazing moment. I wish I could convey the way that entire room - several thousand people - became so absolutely silent, or the look in his eyes, or the tone in his voice. It was a moment of absolute thanks and gratitude; and his words made me realize exactly what the phrase "a life well lived" means.

A friend's mother (a lifelong smoker) passed away from COPD several years ago, and prior to that she had been tethered to an oxygen tank for a long time. They had to move to a downstairs apartment because she was no longer able to go up the stairs without a lot of help. It's a horrible thing.

I smoked from the age of 16 to 22 because everyone I knew back when I was living in Arizona were smokers. Then I moved to California, none of my new friends were smokers, so I quit. I figured at the time I was saving a lot of money. I didn’t even think about the health consequences back then; the info on how bad smoking is for you was so new at that time.
My dad started smoking young (around 13) but quit in his 40s. I think the reports about secondhand smoke was what finally did it. He didn't like the idea of endangering his wife and daughters with it.

My sister smoked for about 20 years and quit, too. Mom and I never took up the habit. Good, I don't need another addiction! ;)
Thank you for sharing your memories and reposting your con report.

I'm glad to hear he achieved all the things he wanted to. He touched literally millions of lives and inspired so many people in so many ways.

I've re-read his last tweet several times, and every time it brings a lump to my throat. It's as if he knew.
His last tweet was amazing.

I'm sure he knew, just as I'm sure my father knew, the last time I saw him. He gave my brother and myself a look that was emotional and full of love and like he was memorizing us. And like he was saying goodbye.

He was not a demonstrative man, and that look was so exceptional to his norm my brother and I discussed it on the way back to the airport (a two hour drive.)

My father died less than two days later.

I think most people who are close to dying know if their minds are still intact.

{{{{{{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}}}}}}}
Wow, the story of your father is both sad and amazing. I'm guessing the way he said goodbye was some comfort to both of you after he passed. (((((((((((hugs))))))))))))
Wow, those are wonderful con memories. Thank you so much for sharing them with us.

The times he was in Germany during my lifetime, I couldn't afford to go and now I'll never get to see him. But all his art will remain for us to enjoy, something I am very grateful for. It is good to hear his success from Star Trek (among other things) enabled him to do all the things on his someday list. That is heartening.
Absolutely, his work lives on, and he created an iconic character who may well last for many many years to come.

That moment at the convention was truly amazing. wish I could convey the way that entire room - several thousand people - became so absolutely silent, or the look in his eyes, or the tone in his voice. It was a moment of absolute thanks and gratitude; and his words made me realize exactly what the phrase "a life well lived" means.

I wish you had been able to see him in person. He had a great, dry sense of humor. I particularly liked the way he'd wear his Number One Vulcan t-shirt at some of the conventions he appeared at as part of various jokes he had with William Shatner.
This is a lovely remembrance. Thank you.
Thank you for sharing these memories. I am also so grateful to have met him once. Such gentleman.

Now Harve is gone, too.

I appreciate your sharing such good memories. I was so shocked and sad to read, just now, that Harve Bennett died yesterday. He was such an important man for ST movies, and so good to so many of us fans. It was thanks to him that I got to go see STV being filmed in 1988, which was such a wonderful day for me, and my good friend Joanna.
I'm sad, sad.