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Apollo Sunrise

Oldfashioned methods still work...!

Wow! I heard from someone I worked with 28 years ago. We kept in touch, on and off, over the years, even after I moved to LA and she moved to Oregon, but I haven’t heard from her in quite some time. And then what should happen? Not via Facebook, not via PeopleSearch, but an honest-to-god postal letter arrives in my mailbox. (smile) Sometimes the oldfashioned ways still work.

I should say now I sent her a snail mail letter back, but I emailed her instead, as she included her email address in the letter. But what the hey, I may just send her a hard copy letter too.

Comments

Oh, yes, send her an old-fashioned letter! :)

I once had a correspondence with a fellow fan in which we routinely wrote 20-page letters back-and-forth, and we turned them around a day or two after receiving them. The exquisite agony of waiting for the mailman and hoping for a letter to open and savor! ;)
I did exactly the same thing "back in the day". I wrote massively long letters to several friends, and back and forth we went, discussing live, the universe, and everything (especially fandom). Oh those wonderful moments of opening my PO box and seeing what lay inside...! That was all so much fun.
I love e-mail, because the speed is a joy, but there is something lost that you had with letters: a sense of personality through handwriting, and being part of a tradition that stretched back centuries, letter-writing to friends. Isn't that always an excuse in Victorian novels? "I must go write some letters." ;)

Also, instant gratification is so endemic now. There was some value in having to wait. We're so spoiled now! :)
>>>I love e-mail, because the speed is a joy, but there is something lost that you had with letters: a sense of personality through handwriting,

There certainly was that, and also in the address labels people used.

Though I guess I didn't "give back" (except in my address labels) because I almost always typed my letters. People could still get a sense of personality, I guess, from my older typewriters, with their wonky eccentric keys. Then I got a Selectric II - what bliss! Less personality, though.

>>>and being part of a tradition that stretched back centuries, letter-writing to friends. Isn't that always an excuse in Victorian novels? "I must go write some letters." ;)

:-) It's there in all the books, isn't it? The writing desk, the pen, the time set aside most days for correspondence. Long tradition indeed.
Yeah . . . thirty-five and forty page letters, sent in oversized envelopes with articles, doo-dads, photos, and whatever else, mostly fandom-related.

Eventually we graduated to those "new-fangled" portable cassette tape recorders and sent tapes back and forth. There was a rare phone call here and there, but there was no such thing as an inexpensive long-distance phone call then.

I lost track, several years ago, of this earliest ST pen pal, but son of a Vulcan if she didn't find me online last year. We exchanged a couple of dozen e-mails in the first day alone.

Keeping in touch these days definitely is so much easier, but there's something to be said for those "old-fashioned ways." :-)
I skipped the whole cassette tape thing. Or rather, I skipped half of it. Friends would send me tapes; I'd type letters in return. I'm one of those people who learn visually; I find it difficult to concentrate on the spoken word if I'm not part of the conversation. I found it much easier to listen to a bit of a tape, type, listen to some more, repeat.

>>>I lost track, several years ago, of this earliest ST pen pal, but son of a Vulcan if she didn't find me online last year.

That is so cool! Several people have found me online, it's so much fun.

And then there's that woman who has been trying to friend me on Facebook, even though she doesn't seem to remember me from anything, and I have no idea who she is either. We finally gave up on figuring it out.
It's comforting to know the old ways still work. I was just saying to Larry that even most of our bills are emailed to us now.
I haven't gone that route yet. I still mail in checks. I spend so much time in front of the computer that I don't want to use any of it for billpaying.
Wow, that is cool! I knew that the old-fashioned penpal thing is still going strong but I wouldn't have expected to reconnect with an old friend that way. If you can, I would send a letter, too. It's such a different joy to not only read what a friend has experienced but also touch what they touched and perhaps see their mood reflected in the handwriting.

That reminds me, I have some letters waiting on my desk and will go answer them now. ;-)
:-) It's delightful you're still handwriting letters...! I do send real Christmas cards every year, but that's about the extent of it.

But I'm bad - if I get a postal letter my first response is to send an email. Not so oldfashioned, after all. :-/
For myself, I love both the more instant modern communication and the slower, more tactile letter writing. Sometimes, I think it's sad that I was born far too late for the days when much of fannish communication went via snail mail.
On the other hand, email, IM, LJ and the like are much, much faster, cheaper and more convenient. I had a conversation with someone a while back, about how the internet makes fandom more accessible for many overseas fans. The ease with which one can distribute fic and vids and source material worldwide is amazing, if you think about it. Off to watch ST clips on youtube now!
>>> I had a conversation with someone a while back, about how the internet makes fandom more accessible for many overseas fans. The ease with which one can distribute fic and vids and source material worldwide is amazing, if you think about it.

Absolutely, it's wonderful. Though people did pretty well with communication "back in the day". It was an Australian writer, Diane Marchant, who wrote the first published K/S story, back in 1974.
Ah, that's...reassuring, particularly when it seems that "old-fashioned" has become a forgotten concept, lol!
LOL, yes! Handwriting? What's that?

I kinda blinked when I heard a recent Japanese fad is writing novels on cellphones...!

(This article also mentions fan fiction):

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1873122-1,00.html