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One of the better articles on fan fiction

One of the better articles on fan fiction. (Am I a bad fan if I still write "fan fiction" instead of "fanfiction"?)

http://www.dailydot.com/geek/complete-guide-to-fanfiction/

Posted to LJ and Dreamwidth. Comment wherever you prefer. :-)

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I will usually use "fanfic," but if it's the long version, it's always "fan fiction" to me. Of course, I may not be a bad fan, but I certainly am an old fan.

For what it's worth, the style sheet for Transformative Works and Cultures adheres pretty strictly to MW11, which means it uses "fan fic" and "fan vid." And "Web site," which is a terminology I gave up on about a decade ago.

(I make decisions about house style for myself and my boss every New Year's. I think the first major change was deciding that I was going to treat "data" as singular in most cases. This year, I decided I was going to relax my stance on the generic "he," at least slightly.)
Yeah, it really surprised me the article claimed the use of "fan fiction" branded one "not a fan." I usually say fanfic these days anyway...

What are you using instead of the generic "he"?
Usage has made 'data' singular for years - I don't remember hearing 'datum' at all until I met it by sheer chance a few years ago - so it's never bothered me. I prefer the use of the generic 'he' over 'their'; one person most definitely isn't plural! In writing, though, I tend to use 's/he'. English does need a singular pronoun that means 'he or she, gender unknown'.
I will go read this--thanks for letting us know.

For over 41 years I have called it fan fiction. I always will call it fan fiction.

I will not accept being chided, taken to task, or corrected by others who would like to insist I call it something else.

:-)
The article is mostly pro fanfic, but it took me by surprise to learn that the term "fan fiction" is obviously so out of style it's usage is considered to be evidence that the person using the term doesn't know the first thing about fan fiction.
Duh?

I usually say fanfic (because I'm lazy) but if I were to use the whole thing? fan fiction every time. To me, 'fanfiction' is typical of the way American usage portmanteaus words UK usage retains as two (and I note my 'check spelling' function is marking 'fanfiction' as wrong and 'fan fiction' as right).

And if people who've been actively involved in writing the stuff for forty years 'don't know the first thing about fan fiction'... who does?
I really wanted to reply to the article to this effect but there were too many hoops to jump through to reply, so I decided not to bother.
I wanted to reply but even without trying decided it probably would want me to do more than I was prepared to (aka 'jump through too many hoops').
I just found out one of the authors of the piece is: "Gavia Baker-Whitelaw is a writer living in Glasgow, Scotland. She currently writes for The Daily Dot as a fandom and internet culture reporter, and blogs about film and costume design under the name HelloTailor. Her work has also appeared in Empire Online, Wired, and Bleeding Cool, and her first short story was recently published in the fantasy anthology Fight Like A Girl."

http://bigbangpress.org/about/aboutus.html
I looked at some of the other things in this article (if that's what you can call it) and noticed that under 'Press' several of the comments, especially the earlier ones, mentioned 'fan fiction' - it was only the later ones that went to 'fanfiction'... and 'involved in reading it for ten years' - ten? that's only a quarter of the time a lot of us fan fiction folk have been involved in fandom!
I noticed that disconnect, too - clearly she's not reading everything on a site she's connected with.

It's not that hard to find older fans - she seems pretty knowledgeable about a lot of aspects of fandom. In the scheme of her article, this is a minor point, but since she started off with it it really stood out.
Well, I tend to use both, depending on how lazy I'm feeling (fanfic is faster to type than fan fiction. *g*) But, really, does it matter? It seems such a ridiculous standard to use in order to say who is and who is not a "true" fan.

But, other than that, it is a pretty good article, (well, other than using a picture of reboot K and S, instead of the original,) so thanks for posting the link.
Yes, agreed; I thought that definition was really "left field" - I enjoyed the rest of the article though.
I felt their use of reboot K & S was proof of how relatively new they are to fandom...
Which makes you wonder just how much expertise she really has in the matter. Still, I did enjoy the bulk of the article.